Our climate research is focused on collecting data that can be used across water, food production and coastal sectors. SECC seeks to improve the understanding of historical climate, forecast intra-seasonal, seasonal, and decadal climate, and project long-term climate. In the coming years, we hope to standardize the way that climate information is used across sectors so that information can be shared in a meaningful way. SECC has generated several high resolution downscaled climate datasets including the more recent Florida Climate Institute-Florida State University Land-Atmosphere Reanalyses version 1.0 (FLAReS1.0; DiNapoli and Misra 2012; Fig. 1) and the Regional Ocean-Atmosphere Reanalysis (ROARS; Li and Misra 2013; Fig. 2), which is used extensively for hydrological and crop modeling applications in the southeast.

Figure 1. The timing of the climatological diurnal precipitation maximum in Jun-July-August from (a) FLAReS 1.0 (Dinapoli & Misra 2012) and (b) corresponding observations of hourly precipitation data from a variety of precipitation sensors.

Figure 1. The timing of the climatological diurnal precipitation maximum in Jun-July-August from (a) FLAReS 1.0 (Dinapoli & Misra 2012) and (b) corresponding observations of hourly precipitation data from a variety of precipitation sensors.

Figure 2. (Left) Surface ocean circulation valid for July 2003 from Regional Ocean-Atmosphere Reanalysis (ROARS; Li & Misra 2014) that provides 15 km grid interval for the period January 1979-December 2010 for the atmosphere and the surrounding ocean to conduct application studies. (Right) Corresponding observations of surface ocean currents from the Satellite valid for July 2003. The colors denote the speed of the current in m/s.

Figure 2. (Left) Surface ocean circulation valid for July 2003 from Regional Ocean-Atmosphere Reanalysis (ROARS; Li & Misra 2014) that provides 15 km grid interval for the period January 1979-December 2010 for the atmosphere and the surrounding ocean to conduct application studies. (Right) Corresponding observations of surface ocean currents from the Satellite valid for July 2003. The colors denote the speed of the current in m/s.

The SECC has been actively engaged in climate application studies in agriculture, hydrology and ecology for a number of years. The strong influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the year-to-year variation of winter and early spring climate over the southeastern US has been fairly well explored in our studies. This research helps in building resilient farming communities in the southeastern US in the face of a varying climate.

The SECC prides itself on the success of the applications of its past climate research, but still recognizes the significant challenges posed by the uncertainty of climate change projections, the relatively low seasonal climate predictability in the main wet season over the Southeast, and the influence of land cover and land use change on local climate. We are continually working with agriculture and water extension specialists in several southeastern universities to innovate effective communication and application tools that can help stakeholders adapt to or mitigate the risk of adverse impacts from climate variability and change.



Stakeholder engagement happens in many areas in the SECC. All stakeholder engagement aims to improve learning about climate impacts and management solutions. Please visit the other ares of this site to find out more about the stakeholder groups listed below:

SRECA was designed to help Extension professionals who bring a variety of perspectives on climate change become leaders and facilitators in their state for appropriate and relevant programming in climate variability and change. At the Academy, individuals worked in sector groups to brainstorm, ask questions, learn about resources and programs related to climate, and report past experiences with climate programs.
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Southeast Climate Extension is working to improve all three aspects of extension: engagement, education, and the successful application of gained knowledge for reducing risk, as well as to advance the use and relevance of climate information for agricultural risk management in the Southeastern U.S.
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SIFT is an online platform to strengthen information exchange and learning among farmers, extension professionals and researchers in the SE USA.
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The Florida Water and Climate Alliance is a stakeholder-scientist partnership committed to increasing the relevance of climate science data and tools at relevant time and space scales to support decision-making in water resource management, planning and supply operations in Florida.
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The SECC’s climate tools are housed on Agroclimate.org. Click the link below or visit the Agriculture page and click “Agriculture Tools” to learn more.

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